Home > divorce, empath, High Conflict Personality, HSP, law, transformation, Uncategorized > Narcissism—it’s Not Your Friend… But Narcissists need Friends. Real Ones.

Narcissism—it’s Not Your Friend… But Narcissists need Friends. Real Ones.

The experts believe narcissism is caused by a wound to the developing psyche. The diagnostic manual DSM IV (used for billing –not for anything useful by way if helping people) includes these traits:

  Lacks the ability to empathize with the feelings or desires of others

  Is arrogant in attitudes and behavior

And “Narcissists have such an elevated sense of self-worth that they value themselves as inherently better than others, when in reality they have a fragile self-esteem, cannot handle criticism, and often try to compensate for this inner fragility by belittling or disparaging others in an attempt to validate their own self-worth”

I happen to know these traits well. I was surrounded by them as a child. I was often puzzled. For example: Riding in the car with my sister, who had long hair. (I probably did too—but I cannot recall for sure.) No air conditioning in those days- so I have the widow open and am happily enjoying the breeze. My sister commands me to close the window as that is how She wants it. (Why is that more important than how I want it? I wonder..)

My mother used to take us to Howard Johnson’s and eat peppermint ice cream with fudge sauce. None for  us kids—“it’s for grownups” she would say. Oddly, I sort of accepted that, at the time.

As soon as we were tall enough to wash dishes my mother bought a set of Melamine dishes so she would not ever have to wash dishes again,. And she didn’t. But I didn’t understand any if this at the tome—except that I could not see why what my sister wanted trumped what I wanted for no reason.

Here’s what the (not authoritative) Wikipedia article says about  the way the works: “Two factors that cause self-view to remain unrealistic are dysfunctional interactions with parents that can be either excessive attention or a lack thereof. For example but not limited to, the excessive attention and lack of attention go hand in hand when a child’s parents are divorced. Usually, one is overindulgent (typically the one seeing the child less) and the other shows less affection.[5] The child either compensates for lack of attention or acts in terms of unrealistic self-perception.

 “The cause of this disorder is unknown; however, Groopman and Cooper (2006) listed the following factors identified by various researchers as possibilities:[2]

  1. An oversensitive temperament (personality traits) at birth. (see HSP…)
  2. Excessive admiration that is never balanced with realistic feedback.
  3. Excessive praise for good behaviors or excessive criticism for bad behaviors in childhood.
  4. Overindulgence and overvaluation by parents, other family members, or peers. (see schools…)
  5. Being praised for perceived exceptional looks or abilities by adults. (Ditto)
  6. Severe emotional abuse in childhood.
  7. Unpredictable or unreliable care giving from parents.
  8. Learning manipulative behaviors from parents.
  9. Valued by parents as a means to regulate their own self-esteem.”I suspect my mother had 1,6, 7 and9 in the bag,


Then there’s also a thing called “parentification”. “Emotional Parentification: This type of parentification forces the child to meet the emotional needs of their parent and usually other siblings also. This kind of parentification is the most destructive. It robs the child of his/her childhood and sets him/her up to have a series of dysfunctions that will incapacitate him/her in life. In this role, the child is put into the practically impossible role of meeting the emotional and psychological needs of the parent. The child becomes the parent’s confidant.”
This was done by my mother—to both my sister and to me, but, I now see, more to my sister. My mother told us details of her sex life with daddy that we never should have heard—for example. My mother and Noel had a secret relationship I only heard about after her death. My sister had hoped the role reversal would be undone– and it was not. My sister was very angry. That much she coped to. The  reasons the mother was never a mother–but became more childlike–and the anger was so huge?? Not so much.

What I was not able to  see until I was much older is that Noel had been enlisted as my mother’s ally, confident and… parent. Unfortunately,  they also used me to meet their needs as a unit. It was a mess. (In many ways, it still is.)

For my part, having no real parenting, and very off and on care giving of any sort, I became the opposite—so perfectionist that, at about age 50, I realized this was a form of “reverse narcissism.” By what set of rules must I be better than everyone else—blameworthy for even the smallest error?

That has been a long battle to fight. Feeling I am defective—and being told don’t be 1) so hard on yourself 2) so analytical 3) so idealistic.

But I eventually did see that this was a shadow form of narcissism, and it released MOST of its hold on me. (It’s still a reflex though—I have to say “YOU ARE NOT THE FIRST PERSON TO _____”. (Lose the Netflix mailed liner for example.)

So why am I telling you all this? Well, for one, I have no one to tell my story to. But that aside, this is all too common- and all too often tied with divorce. (Both as cause and effect.)  Oversimplification seems rampant in law—but then, it’s also rampant on television  and I don’t think Twitter is helping. This is the not-so-simple stuff.

But the truth is the truth and the truth is wounded human beings abound. Wounded humans create other wounded human beings. And punishing the wounded human beings does  not unwound them.  And in family law, it unravels families. It does not, and cannot, knit them up.

So, except for Bill Eddy (whose work has tremendous potential for helping the wounded people in the divorce arena –he has coined the term “High Conflict Personality” ,which I am sure he would agree has the above characteristics—as he is both a therapist and an attorney, has created a communication model that  includes empathetic listening)  no one seems to care. Thanks to Bill… some new s tools are coming into the picture. I quote:

“Everyone gets upset some of the time. High conflict people get upset a lot of the time. A simple technique called an “E.A.R. Statement” can help you calm others down. This is especially helpful if you are in a close relationship or a position of authority. High conflict people tend to emotionally attack those closest to them and those in authority, especially when they are frustrated and can’t manage their own emotions. The intensity of their uncontrolled emotions can really catch you off-guard. But if you practice making E.A.R. statements you can connect with upset people and usually help them calm down.

E.A.R. Statements

E.A.R. stands for Empathy, Attention and Respect. It is the opposite of what you feel like giving someone when he or she is upset and verbally attacking YOU! Yet you will be amazed at how effective this is when you do it right.

An E.A.R. Statement connects with the person’s experience, with their feelings. For example, let’s say that someone verbally attacks you for not returning a phone call as quickly as he or she would have liked. “You don’t respect me! You don’t care how long I have to wait to deal with this problem! You’re not doing your job!”

Rather than defending yourself, give the person an E.A.R. Statement, such as: “Wow, I can hear how upset you are. Tell me what’s going on. I share your concerns about this problem and respect your efforts to solve it.” This statement included:
EMPATHY:         “I can hear how upset you are.”
ATTENTION:     “Tell me what’s going on.”
RESPECT:         “I respect your efforts.”

OK, So I admit I am still working on this when it comes to my own family—but I know they are wounded, so I guess I will forgive myself for not feeling all that warm and fuzzy about them. In any case, this technique works. Note that EMPATHY, not blame, is the key. The missing link.

Last but not least—I want to add that it might be a good idea of we stopped idolizing the really high functioning narcissists who make lots of money—at our expense. See the “The Wolf of Wall Street”.  (I like House and Sherlock and Patrick Jane though… Hey—to me it seems they have a real side, a kind side.. .  and people LISTEN TO THEM. So I want to be like them. But they are fiction. I know. Sigh.)

But me—I just want the world to know 1) this is real and common, and 2) If you are arrogant and condescending toward me- I WILL “overreact”. You can count on it.

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  1. February 2, 2014 at 4:51 am

    Fascinating, Carroll. A lot is familiar to me, as my dad, I’m positive, was a high-functioning narcissist. My ex is, too, altho she thinks I am. I do know I don’t respond well to criticism, especially if it’s condescending and dismissive. I learned about HSP from you, and am pretty sure it applies to me, as well. I look at it as both a blessing and a curse, realizing that the two are inseparable. However, understanding it makes it easier to cope. Thanks for this.

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